Project & Resources planning,

Top Hot 3 Tools to Manage Any Project Ever

3 m read
Olga, chief editor
Olga, chief editor Marketing Manager
May 29, 2015
Share on
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Being a project manager is hard and requires lots of effort, dedication and determination. I will certainly bore you with numerous nuances (until my next series of articles I have prepared for you, at least) of this profession as there are just too many to perfectly fit in one post. Let’s talk about things that tend to make life easier for a moment. We have Project management tools, for example.

Are all of them great? No, certainly not. Most PM tools are horrific and deliver nothing but more headache. However, there are several really handy ones, we will be talking about in this post. Here is my personal top 3 picks for PM tools:

Trello

trello-icon Trello: this particular tool is amazing for all of you Kanban fans out there. You may just prefer using notes, or cards in for easier categorization and organization. In either case Trello is exactly what you are looking for then. Best sides of this Project management tool?

  • It is fast,
  • Simple,
  • Flexible,
  • And fun to use

Interface: Trello offers a really comfortable drag-&-drop interface. Different boards may be created and arranged for various projects, each will look as a cet of cards. Due dates, timelines and descriptions may be added to all the cards. By the way, Trello is also available on mobile devices that run on iOS and Android.

Price: Trello is considerably free to use, however it has a premium version – Trello Gold. This premium account allows several neat visual updates, smooth custom backgrounds, stickers, emoji and simply looks better. And larger files may be attached with this premium plan. Moreover, it is a nice (one of really few) way to support Trello.

Asana

AsanaAsana: This PM tool is designed for multiple hybrid tasks. Its functionality allows easy collaboration to both individuals and businesses of all sizes. You will be able to create and assign tasks with detailed descriptions and checklists that are covering all milestones (in theory). It’s best fin in corporate projects and is a sweet task manager.

Interface: Asana is fairly simple to use, you can easily add multiple projects and tracking them will be easy. All relevant information will be displayed in the sidebar on your left. Projects may be structured with descriptions and checklists. You can set up deadlines or you can create dependencies in which one ticket may not be close unless all related work is finished. Asana is also available on both Android and iOS platforms.

Price: relatively free. When you hit fifteen or more people on one single project you will be charged a fee.

Evernote

EvernoteEvernote: this tool is not designed to manage projects, however it lineally nails its job with everything related to you making and sharing notes. Just start using it and you will never regret a single moment you have wasted to download and install it. With Evernote you can:

  • Create notes,
  • Create notebooks,
  • Organize numerous materials,
  • Digitize handwritten materials,
  • And all that may be done with surprising ease

Interface: You will not have to worry about any organization of all your many notes. The more the merrier, and let the tool take care of the arrangement. All the data you store, whether noted in the app or digitalized can be easily tossed inside relevant notebooks. There is an entire eco-system of apps integrated inside Evernote. If you can imagine something you should be able to do with your notes, the odds are Evernote is the tool you should use. And it supports mobile platforms.

Price: It’s mostly free as well, but there are premium plans available ($5 per month or $45 per year). Premium grants you offline access. More space, improved search functionality and new collaboration tools.

These 3 seemingly simple tools have revolutionized my life and have certainly brought value to numerous projects out there. What are your favorite PM tools? Please share them in the comments!

Categories

Recent Posts

  • Refactor or not refactor? Everything there is to know about refactoring

    Read more
  • What is Ambient Proximity? Definetely More Than A Buzzword

    Read more
  • GDPR: why so serious?

    Read more
Yes
Share on
Privacy Preference Center
Your Privacy

When you visit any web site, it may store or retrieve information on your browser, mostly in the form of cookies. This information might be about you, your preferences or your device and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to. The information does not usually directly identify you, but it can give you a more personalized web experience. Because we respect your right to privacy, you can choose not to allow some types of cookies. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings. However, blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer.

Strictly Necessary Cookies Always Active

These cookies are necessary for the website to function and cannot be switched off in our systems. They are usually only set in response to actions made by you which amount to a request for services, such as setting your privacy preferences, logging in or filling in forms.

You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not then work. These cookies do not store any personally identifiable information.

Performance Cookies

These cookies allow us to count visits and traffic sources so we can measure and improve the performance of our site. They help us to know which pages are the most and least popular and see how visitors move around the site.

All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. If you do not allow these cookies we will not know when you have visited our site, and will not be able to monitor its performance.

Cookies used

Google Analytics
Functional Cookies

When you visit any web site, it may store or retrieve information on your browser, mostly in the form of cookies. This information might be about you, your preferences or your device and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to. The information does not usually directly identify you, but it can give you a more personalized web experience. Because we respect your right to privacy, you can choose not to allow some types of cookies. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings. However, blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer.

Cookies used

Test Second Test
Targeting Cookies

When you visit any web site, it may store or retrieve information on your browser, mostly in the form of cookies. This information might be about you, your preferences or your device and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to. The information does not usually directly identify you, but it can give you a more personalized web experience. Because we respect your right to privacy, you can choose not to allow some types of cookies. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings. However, blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer.

More Information

When you visit any web site, it may store or retrieve information on your browser, mostly in the form of cookies. This information might be about you, your preferences or your device and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to. The information does not usually directly identify you, but it can give you a more personalized web experience. Because we respect your right to privacy, you can choose not to allow some types of cookies. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings. However, blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer.