IT Blog, Java Development,

Enterprise Java upgrade targeted to PaaS clouds

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QArea Expert
QArea Expert Marketing Manager
June 27, 2011
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Java cloud

Java EE 7 will offer multi-tenancy support the same way as the runtime environment for operating a Java application within the cloud.

The following version of Java will be adjusted with capabilities for Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud computing, this Thursday afternoon an Oracle official said in offering specifics concerning what to expect in the next upgrade.

Java EE, Java Platform Enterprise Edition is destined for release in the 3d quarter of the next year. As Oracle Java EE platform lead, Linda DeMichiel said their main goal is to make the Java EE platform ready for deployment in the cloud in such a way you may utilize your Java EE apps into a cloud environment. She also offered to have a glimpse at a following Java EE 8 release that would be entirely modular and tuned for usage in SaaS cloud computing.

Java EE with PaaS would supply with the runtime environment for Java application running in the cloud. Backing in Java EE 7 PaaS would fortify evolutionary change, with multi-tenancy support, little programming models and new roles of platform. DeMichiel said that to enable multi-tenancy, resource managers and obviously containers are going to require cooperating starting from providing isolation among the tenants and passing along tenant identifiers. Useful to a cloud environment APIs would be added in Java EE 7, including JCache that is designed for transient in-memory caching of Java objects as well as JAX-RS that is a Java API for quit access to services.

DeMichiel stated that they expect that applications will require asserting themselves as cloud-enabled. And this can impose extra restrictions on what app code could be able to do.

Among other things in its PaaS capabilities, Java EE 7 is adjusted to have limited support for SaaS, where an application may support manifold tenants but every tenant receives a separate example of an application. Oracle regards SaaS as the capability to use a cloud application where the application may serve many customers or tenants. Parts planned for addition in Java EE 7 contain a cloud provider, such as PaaS provider and Java EE product, together with cloud customer roles, as for example end user or application administrator.

An update to the Web profile eyed for Java EE 7 introduced in Java EE 6 that offered a set of capabilities of Java deployment for Web development. This update may include JAX-RS support. And other capabilities aimed for the release comprises of improved configuration alignment and capabilities of Managed Beans across such technologies as Context and Dependency Injenction (CDI), JavaServer Faces and Enterprise JavaBeans. Managed Beans is a piece of Java Management Extensions technology that supplies tools for system objects, managing applications, service-oriented networks and devices. Managed Beans present various computing resources.

Oracle, along with Java EE 8 is planning modularity close to what is empowered in the Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE) 8 specification, together with more SaaS capabilities. More cloud-related APIs, as for example one for NoSQL databases and there is can be introduced cloud profile for Java. Java EE 8 could also get capabilities targeted for Java EE 7 which were not ready in due time.

A Java language and compiler developer in Oracle, Daniel Smith noted at the Conference that Java SE 8, that is due in late 2012, is adjusted to have capabilities from Project Lambda, to boost accommodations and programming for multi-core processors. Smith also added that their goal is to provide some parallel libraries.

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