IT Blog, Web Development,

Klaus Purer: clever and enthusiastic vegetarian Drupal developer

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QArea Expert
QArea Expert Marketing Manager
November 5, 2011
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Klaus PurerKlaus Purer is a very active staff of the Drupal company, especially active he has been with project applications. What is meant by active? He has annotated on almost twice as big amount of projects as one the most fruitful commenter. Although he just got implicated month ago, he’s obligated for even more reviews of the more projects in the last half of the year!

How it happened, that you got to Drupal?

It started during my implication in the students program at the Vienna University of Technology in 2006. At that time I was just a common user, publishing news and watched the web site being updated and interesting. In 2008 I was thinking about some work conjointly computer science research and one day ran into a job blurb by jpetso. It looked very eye-catching to me because it stated “actively participating in a free source program project” and as I was a little acquainted with Drupal it was a great coincidence. So I took a start at Pro.Karriere as part-time employment a Drupal developer, my first patch was made for Comment CCK . Another promotion for my implication was the Summer of Code program by Google in 2009, where I created a  draft for the Rules.

How do you cooperate with Drupal today?

This year I accomplished my master dissertation, which states about the Web Service Customers unit. I’m working on eRecruiter, a Drupal 7 allocation for internet job advertisement. I help fago to sustain Rules and between times Entity API, the work with RESTWS really appeals me and I time to tome have to do militant, blank Drupal-work-around units like Role Export. I work as a tutor of Google Summer of Code and I am huffish of what my student Sepgil finalized this year (Rules Link).

What made you to start the project application review procedure?

I noticed people sniveling online about the project apps output order and the vast indebtedness. And because of my curiosity I started to wonder how hard it could appear to write a review, and I understood that it truly is pretty simple. Then I concerned how many reviews could an author do in 24 hours. It took me some time during the weekend and I minted approximately 130 issues. I got excited by the success and went on with my labor, having the goal at the moment to achieve zero “needs review” editions. Actually, haven’t managed yet, but will surely go for it when I have time. In my opinion it is key-note for the Drupal association to get more programmers on broadside, for the growth not only of the user foundation but also the staff foundation.

Are there any favorite moments for you from that process?

It is a satisfaction when projects speedily transform from a lousy cipher base to a pure and grinded variant. It is delightful to see people caring about their job, want to be taught and want to create it right. They feel excited being countenanced and expanding their stimulation pulse to others, even to me. There is one more huge aspect; I myself got a lot of knowledge staying a reviewer. The most worth-while information is the secrecy reviews by greggles that indicate flaws in the code that can be easily depleted by another plotter. It can really injure when greggles fires down an issue for safety grounds that you RTBC’ed earlier before, but I still estimate it because of the growth of my acquaintance about safety solutions and my kenning how to spot them.

Were there any worthy projects you’ve got acquainted with through that procedure?

Definitely, yes. Surely people don’t create blockbuster additions like Views or Rules like their first Drupal module, but some glorious ideas like Guest, Fixed field, User Email Domain and others that I can’t remember at the moment are still alive.

What modifications do you believe will follow the project review procedure?

I hope to get more reviewers dragged in. We can computerize the reviews a little bit (I brought into being a bash scenario to do some general checking, see PAReview.sh), but anyway we need human approbation later in the procedure. It is planned to unfold some automatic processing on drupal.org distinctly, but that long term activity does not fix the problem of insufficiency of reviewers now. A conventional project review can be done in quarter of an hour, so if bigger number of people would just write one per day or even in a week we would not face any problems.

It seams that you’re a visitor of several Drupal confrontations. What did you like of these events?

The atmosphere. It ‘s warm of friendly human conversations. People are very nice and welcoming and the division of entry is lower than possible. It is pleasant that almost no ranking exists between the visitors and that you can communicate with just anyone you’d like to.

Are there any background things, that interesting you outside Drupal?

My life goes in Vienna, Austria, and I’m a free source software fan. I equalize programming languages with eagerness, so I hate PHP, am interested in ethics, politics, gender studies and philosophy. I am a vegetarian by the way.

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